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The Coronary (Cardiac) Care Unit at 50 Years: A Major Advance in the Practice of Hospital Medicine

This year, 2017, marks the 50th anniversary commemorating the publication of an article describing the results from the classic study by Killip and Kimball showing a reduction in mortality from acute myocardial infarction in patients sequestered in a specialized hospital unit1 at New York Hospital in New York City. Also described in the article was the […]

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elder woman sick in bed with husband looking on

Death and Dignity: Exploring Physicians’ Responsibilities After a Patient’s Death

Literature focused on care at the end of life is flourishing. The scope of this work has been broad, including how to best communicate bad news1, 2 or discuss patient wishes at the end of life,3, 4 as well as detailing where patients are dying and how it impacts their care5 and the value of palliative and hospice care during […]

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Quality of Life, Dyspnea, and Functional Exercise Capacity Following a First Episode of Pulmonary Embolism

We aimed to evaluate health-related quality of life (QOL), dyspnea, and functional exercise capacity during the year following the diagnosis of a first episode of pulmonary embolism. Methods This was a prospective multicenter cohort study of 100 patients with acute pulmonary embolism recruited at 5 Canadian hospitals from 2010-2013. We measured the outcomes QOL (by […]

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Concierge Medicine Is Here and Growing!!

An increasing number of primary care physicians are downsizing to a concierge medical practice (also termed “retainer-based medicine”). In a concierge medical practice, the physician limits the number of patients in his practice and offers exclusive services for an annual fee. The patient pays a surcharge for increased access and additional services from their physician.1 […]

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Humanizing the Electronic Medical Record with the Personal Fact

The current model of patient care promotes a system wherein patients are viewed as diseases with treatment plans rather than individuals with a lifetime of experiences. This is further exaggerated by the electronic medical record, wherein streams of impersonal data are presented above the patient narrative. Quantitative data are crucial for medical management, but it […]

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